Money and lifestyle – 6 Minute English


Neil: Hello, and welcome to 6 Minute English. I’m Neil. Rob: And I’m Rob. Neil: In this programme we’re talking about finance and in particular planning for our future lifestyles. Rob: I can barely afford my current lifestyle! Neil: Same here, but perhaps we’ll pick up some good tips today. Before that though, a question. Being a millionaire may be an impossible dream for most of us, but when was the word first used in English? Was it: a) 1600s, b) 1700s, or c) 1800s – What do you think, Rob? Rob: I’m going to guess that it’s the 1600s as there have always been very wealthy people. Neil: Well, I’ll reveal the answer later. Now, the BBC Money Box programme covers all sorts of financial features. Recently they were talking about lifestyle financial planning, which is planning your finances to meet the kind of lifestyle you want to have. Julie Lord leads a financial planning organisation and she talked about the process of lifestyle financial planning. How many numbers does she say you need to start with? Julie Lord: Well, we would start by saying that we need to put together a lifetime cashflow forecast or a model. You just need four numbers: your income, your expenditure, assets, liabilities and then we project forward to show you what sort of lifestyle you will have if you do nothing at all and if indeed you do some of the things that – perhaps an ISA or a Pension or any other kind of financial product – might help you with. Neil: So how many numbers do you need? Rob: She says that you start with just four numbers. Neil: That’s right. The first of these numbers is your income. This is the money that you have coming in. Your salary, for example. Rob: Then there is the number for your expenditure. This is the money you have going out: for rent, food, entertainment, transport and so on. Neil: The next number was for assets. This is the cash value of things that you own. For example property, cars, jewellery as well as savings and investments, that kind of thing. Rob: And finally there is liabilities. This is the money that you owe, for example on credit cards or loans. Neil: So if you know these details, she says they can come up with a lifetime cashflow forecast, which is a calculation of how much money you can expect to have in the future and if that is enough to meet your expectations. Do you have those details? Do you know your numbers, Rob? Rob: I have a very detailed spreadsheet where I do list my income and expenditure. So I do know from month to month how much money I need and how much I can spend. Neil: That sounds very organised! What does it tell you about your future? Rob: Well, it just reminds me of exactly how much money I don’t have. It’s quite depressing! How about you, Neil? Neil: Oh, I live in blissful ignorance. I have no idea how big my debts are. I try not to worry about it. I kind of think I’m much too young to worry about it now and that as if by magic it will all work out in the end. So it would be difficult for me to come up those four numbers. Anyway, let’s listen to Julie Lord again describing the lifestyle financial planning process. Julie Lord: Well, we would start by saying that we need to put together a lifetime cashflow forecast or a model. You just need four numbers: your income, your expenditure, assets, liabilities and then we project forward to show you what sort of lifestyle you will have if you do nothing at all and if indeed you do some of the things that – perhaps an ISA or a pension or any other kind of financial product – might help you with. Neil: Is lifestyle financial planning only for older people with a good pension? Not according to Julie Lord. Julie Lord: Well, it’s not all about old age, is it? I mean, there are people… we have quite a number of younger clients who come to us and say ‘we just want to get financially organised, we’ve heard about all this stuff, these financial products, no idea really what they are or, more importantly, what they’re going to do for us, so can you give us a hand to help us look forward to see what will happen’. Neil: So she also has younger clients who ask for her company’s help. Rob: Yes, she uses the phrase, give us a hand, which means to help someone. If you give someone a hand, you help them. Neil: Exactly, in the way that I give you a hand with 6 Minute English. Rob: Well, I think I give you a hand rather than the other way around, Neil. Neil: Really, well let’s not fall out about it. Let’s listen to Julie Lord again. Julie Lord: Well, it’s not all about old age, is it? I mean, there are people… we have quite a number of younger clients who come to us and say ‘we just want to get financially organised, we’ve heard about all this stuff, these financial products, no idea really what they are or, more importantly, what they’re going to do for us, so can you give us a hand to help us look forward to see what will happen’. Neil: It’s nearly time now to review our vocabulary, but first, let’s have the answer to our quiz question. When was the word millionaire first used in English? Was it: a) 1600s, b) 1700s, or c) 1800s – What did you think, Rob? Rob: Well, I guessed and said it was the 1600s. Neil: Well, not a good guess this time, I’m afraid. It’s actually a lot later. It was the 1800s when it was first used in English, though had appeared in French in the 1700s. Now on with the vocabulary. Rob: Yes, we had a lot of financial terms in this programme. We had cashflow forecast. This is a calculation of how much money you can expect to have at a particular time in the future. Neil: And the cashflow forecast is based on knowing your income, which is the money you have coming in and your expenditure, the money you have going out. Rob: You also need to know your assets, which is the value of things you own as well as savings and investments. This is balanced against your liabilities, which is the term for the money that you owe, for example on credit cards. Neil: And finally we had the expression ‘to give someone a hand’ meaning to help someone. Well, that’s all from us in this programme. We look forward to your company next time. Until then, you can find us in all the usual places on social media, online and on our app. Just search for bbclearninglish. Bye, and thanks, Rob, for giving me a hand. Rob: No, thank you for giving me a hand. Bye!

About the author

Comments

  1. 💰 Can money buy you happiness? 🤗
    Money which is used to free up your time makes you happier than money which is spent on material things, such as shoes, Canadian scientists have reported.
    Dan and Catherine teach you language you can use to discuss this story: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aEofCqWuCT0&t=17s

  2. Hi
    Thank you so much
    Actually as you have said it is impossible dream to be millionaire for most humans at the present moment,but we hope to be in black not in red.
    Thanks for your time.

  3. Congratulations. You explained the four expressions "income, expenditures, assets and liabilities" very well. In fact you need a lot of backround knowledge – especially in accounting!

  4. Many people nowadays have more assets but they could not find happiness by owning them. Therefore, I strongly believe that money has nothing to do with happiness.

  5. Hi there !

    I think Ms Lord has been the hardest interviewed to listen to. She speaks really fast !

    Thanks for the video guys !

  6. I think that this organization doesn't make any sense, because if I'm 30 years old and have a good skills, a good job earning me a big salary, and some properties, I will inevitably have a comfortable and rich life in the future unless I die.

  7. income รายได้ don't put all eggs in one basket
    expenditure รายจ่าย cut down on unnecessary things
    asset ทรัพย์สิน Your house is not your asset. Assets are things which their values are increasing over time.
    debt or liability หนี้สิน pay off your debts, you'll be fine.
    For Thai salarymen and salarywomen, they should put their money away for retirement. I recommend the SET50 index fund; it makes good profits in the long run.
    Stock market is a place for long-term investment, not for speculation or getting rich quick!

  8. Thanks for a great lesson!! But I miss watching you guys instead of only the picture on the background…

  9. Text me if you wanna practice English with me(my level’s about Intermediate maybe a little higher)

  10. I hope my English listening skill can be improved as I hear audios from 6 minutes English everyday. I not only make progress in my English but also learn some brand new things from them, Thank in advanced

  11. Dear the BBC, if by magic you can make longer lines of translation, it will be better to keep up with the words. I almost am dying after watching your 6 minute video

  12. Could you show me how can I creat subtitles or find somewhere on YouTube. If I want to see subtitles I have to espace YouTube and access into the main web BBC.com
    Thank for your reply!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *