The Bayeux Tapestry – Seven Ages of Britain – BBC One


This is the Bayeux tapestry it was commissioned to celebrate Williams conquest of England It begins with the events that led up to it the death of Edward the Confessor king of England and the succession of a new king Harold It’s magical to be taken back a thousand years in this dark chamber to see history Spelled out for you 70 Metres long right down to the end right round and the back and the story very vividly told That at the same time along the friezes top and bottom wonderfully vivid pictures Some of them of aesop’s fables some of little stories some nobody knows what they are little details of farming life here ploughing Sowing and the man Killing birds with a sling It’s not strictly speaking a tapestry. It’s actually Needlework sewn with Wool onto Linen I Suppose the story that we know best begins with the death of Edward the Confessor and his burial in West Minster Abbey West minster Abbey here with the hand of God blessing it and Here Harold receiving the crown With his orb and his scepter people looking on and then spies come across and Explain to William in Normandy what’s happened in England. That Harold has seized the crown and Here he orders ships to be built for an invasion so the first thing to cut down the trees and start building the ships putting aboard suits of chainmail leading two men to carry them and Spears Arrows and The last stage is to get the horses on board these long ships very tricky, and they don’t look particularly happy The boats set sail they cross over to Pevensey Land safely at Pevensey ago ashore, and then the real task begins, but first the army has to be fed There’s a tureen, there, being boiled. They’re sort of chicken Kebabs they look like and here William feasting with his men and then they’re preparing for war They build a a castle of wood at Hastings William’s Followers set light to some of the anglo-Saxon houses a woman leading her child away from her burning house and then battle commences quite slowly to start with with the cavalry charging against Harold’s forces Heads chopped off hands chopped off and the battle rages all day long in the confusion of the battle as swords and axes clang against shields a dangerous rumor sweeps William’s Army that he has been killed so what does he do he turns around in his saddle? lifts his helmet off and shows himself to his troops and the Battle goes on And then we come to the famous design of Harold with the arrow in his eye Nobody quite knows whether that is what happened and here slaughtered I’ve seen this many times every time I see it. I have to say just brings the whole story of William’s invasion of England alive, you rarely feel here because this was done by people Living only a Few years after the event you rarely feel the power and the passion that went into it It’s a completely magical work of art

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Comments

  1. It's looking more like a history of England – but of course it won't be called that.

    England has been abolished without the consent of its people.

  2. This was very flimsy and old fashioned history at its worst, but then you'd expect that from the BBC. This programme said nothing about the British and implied that all of our early culture was 'given' to us by invaders. Bollocks. And one measly programme to cover 700 years of history!

  3. a wonderful documentary series this. the only downside is the annoying soundtrack that the BBC has laid on thick, its like some broad sweeping production of Braveheart or Rob Roy or somesuch rather than a load of old relics. thanks

  4. The most recent episode of The seven ages of Britain was on on Sunday the 7th of March, it is now Thursday the

  5. (carried on from previous)

    11th of March and I would like to know why the FUCK it is not on BBC iPlayer.

    Get it sorted, BBC you bunch of useless twats.

  6. I saw this Tapestry very recently and this clip (as good as it it) doesn't really capture it's magnificence.

  7. @TheTVLicence Well the English made it, but since it was ordered and possibly paid for by the Normans, it is rightfully French. That's why it's called the Bayeux Tapestry.

  8. @TheAssasinkid If you dont know where we've been you dont know where we are going. This shit is why things are the way they are.

  9. @sugarraygras i couldnt give 2 shits im an aussie and i dont care what u guys did before you came to australia. Don't try to sound smart "this shit is why things are always the way they are" oooooh aren't you cool you said that im holding back society well excuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuseeeee meeee
    btw im probably smarter than u i have scholarship bitch 😛

  10. @kid If you were smart you would not think it probable that you are more intelligent than someone you have no way of knowing anything about. Tis an improbable method of deducing probability, which clearly indicates that you are not smart at all. Furthermore, I didnt say you are holding back society, it was you that said that. I would not attribute such a momentous consequence to someone of so little importance as you. 'Those who do not know their history are doomed to repeat it'. Biaatch.

  11. @sugarraygras And there's no such thing as an "improbable method of deducing probability". How the fuck can figuring out how likely something is be an unlikely way of doing it. Also how would you know that I was of little importance? It is not possible to know that and nobody thinks you're smart just because you use big words like momentous or consequence.

  12. @sugarraygras wow because that was a very original comment to make. I don't doubt that my friends two year old brother could come up with a better insult.

  13. @CaptainDavianThuleII how am i iliterate or uneducated? You are making usumptions about people you do not know. Another thing, what are you going to do if I dont shut up?

  14. I just saw the bayeux tapestry today, he is basically only repeating what the audio guide they give you is saying word of word lol

  15. @AuxaneD It wasn't a French colony at all, it continued to be a Kingdom in it's own right, the French King had no authority in England. In fact, the French support of William completely backfired on them, because French lands were now the property of the English Kings.

  16. thus it is the same for the handful of Vikings who settled in Normandy, France! They were not many did not as a rule women or children with them!
    They are quick to take local women and are thus mixed with the locals! And two-generation language and Scandinavian culture disappeared! no more than the Scandinavian name of Norman! As there remains the name of the Franks of France, Burgundy and the name of Burgundy! That is why the Normans are French!

  17. The proof is that when the Normans arrived in England! they despised the Anglo-Saxons, but they have despised the Danes who were descendants of the Vikings since the time of the Danelaw

  18. You know, i was forced to watch this shit in my college class… But there is so much RAGE in this comments section that i actually want to read all of it. HAH

  19. yea i knw in our school our teacher was like dont tell antone i said this but is name was BASTARD. He litterally wispered it and hal of us didnt knw what he was saying but then he said it louder

  20. We can't technically know whether or not though this really happened, because William could have easily of changed the story to make himself look more victorius then he really was!

  21. What is amazing is the fact of the survival of the tapestry. Very few pieces of medieval textiles have managed to come down to us, most having been destroyed over the centuries. And yet here we have what basically amounts to a "comic strip" illustrating the momentous event of Hastings. And even more remarkably, created by people only a few years after the event–just as the narrator states.

  22. Probably because we are told in our society and by the rest of the world including America that tells us we should not be proud.

  23. Can't believe the BBC didn't mention embroidery scene 33 on the Bayeux tapestry showing Halley's comet in 1066 !

  24. Is anyone else here because they are direct descendants of William the Conqueror? I am, and I'm sure there's a million more.

  25. That load of rubbish could only come from one of those arrogant, self-indulgent Yanks.with no sense whatsoever of selv-criticism.

  26. baddogonline has certainly, and rather embarrassingly, firmly established himself as a Yank.
    One wonders what's wrong in having a socialist or a collective world-view. The rest of the world have only been laughing at these puerile Americans raising their ugly protests against e.g.Obama's long overdue health-care reform. Yanks can't tell "socialist" from "communist". When shall we see another irate Joe McCarthy destroying a whole nation with his venom? -probably within long.

  27. "Magical work of art"? More like a glorification of human barbarism, lust for power, and tacky needlepoint.

  28. The Bayeux Tapestry, a historical record created in the 11th century, is the only masterpiece
    of its kind in the world. The most extraordinary thing about it is its sheer size. It is a huge
    embroidered piece of linen cloth measuring 70 metres long and 50 metres high. The pictures
    tell the story of the conquest of England, by William the Conqueror in 1066. The designers
    sectioned the story into 72 separate scenes, which begin with the King of England, Edward the
    Confessor, shown close to death in 1064 and ends with the crushing defeat of the Anglo-
    Saxons by the Normans at Hastings on the south coast of England. It shows King Harold with
    an arrow in his eye. The scenes which include battles kidnappings ransoms are embroidered in
    rich colours which bears no resemblance to reality. Animals, for example, can be depicted in
    blue, green or yellow. For many years the tapestry, which served as a decoration in the
    cathedral at Bayeux, was little known outside the town. Today, after being meticulously
    repaired, it is on display for tourists.

  29. This is the Bayeux Tapestry.  It was commissioned to celebrate WIlliam’s conquest of England and it begins with the events that led up to it.  The death of Edward the Confessor, king of England, and the succession of a new king, Harold.  It’s magical to be taken back 1000 years in this dark chamber to see history spelt out for you.  70m long right down to the end and round at the back.  And the story, very vividly told, but at the same time, along the friezes, top and bottom, wonderfully vivid pictures, some of them of Aesop’s fables, some of little stories, some nobody knows what they are.  Little details of farming life here, ploughing, sowing and a man killing birds with a sling.  It’s not, strictly speaking, a tapestry, it’s actually needlework, sewn with wool onto linen.  

    I suppose the story that we know best begins with the death of Edward the Confessor and his burial in Westminster Abbey.  Westminster Abbey here with the hand of God blessing it.  And here Harold receiving the crown, with his orb and his sceptre.  People looking on.  Then spies come across and explain to William in Normandy what’s happened in England, that Harold has seized the crown.  And here he orders ships to be built for an invasion.  So, the first thing is to cut down the trees, and start building the ships.  Putting aboard suits of chainmail, needing two men to carry them.  And spears, arrows.  And the last stage is to get the horses on board these long ships.  Very tricky and they don’t look particularly happy.  The boats set sail, they cross over to Pevensey, land safely at Pevensey, go ashore and then the real task begins.  But first the army has to be fed.  There’s a terrine there being boiled.  They’re sort of chicken kebabs, they look like.  And here WIlliam feasting with his men.  And then they’re preparing for war.  They build a castle of wood at Hastings.  William’s followers set light to some of the Anglo Saxon houses.  A woman leading her child away from her burning house.  And then battle commences.  Quite slowly to start with, with the cavalry charging against Harold’s forces.  Heads chopped off, hands chopped off and the battle rages all day long.  In the confusion of the battle, as swords and axes clang against shields, a dangerous rumour sweeps William’s army – that he has been killed.  So what does he do?  He turns round in his saddle, lifts his helmet off, and shows himself to his troops, and the battle goes on.  And then we come to the famous design of Harold with the arrow in his eye.  Nobody quite knows whether that is what happened.  And here, slaughtered.  

    I’ve seen this many times.  Every time I see it, I have to say, it just brings the whole story of William’s invasion of England alive.  You really feel here, because this was done by people living only a few years after the event, you really feel the power and the passion that went into it.  It’s a completely magical work of art.

  30. My teacher put this on in history class when the snoz came up everyone laughed ……. we got detention

  31. During the battle, when William shows his face, h's on a different coloured horse than the one he commenced battle on. The Norman chroniclers have an explanation for this: his first horse was killed and he was thrown onto the ground. That's why his men thought him slain. The English were pushing forward, and Earl Gyrth advanced on William's position. That's when the Normans began to flee, so their own record says. They disingenuously blamed the Bretons for this predicament, but we can see the Breton cavalry overpowering the men of both Earls, Leofwine and Gyrth. The Breton leader, Count Alan Rufus, is shown personally confronting Gyrth. This is confirmed by Domesday Book which informs us that William and Alan divided the lion's share of Gyrth's estates between them.

  32. The Deathbed Prophecy of King Edward the Confessor, 1066
    https://hitchhikeamerica.wordpress.com/2014/02/26/the-deathbed-prophecy-of-king-edward-the-confessor-1066/

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